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Staffordshire Terrier???

chico2
February 18th, 2005, 09:12 AM
Call me dog-ignorant,but in the Star this morning there is an article about a Staffordshire Terrier being hurt in a park in Toronto,by a rusty old bench.
Are Staffordshire Terriers not usually called pit-bulls??? If this dog had attacked someone,he probably would have been described as a pit-bull,right??? Just wondering...

sammiec
February 18th, 2005, 09:47 AM
Yup, you're right Chico. A Staffordshire Terrier is part of the pit bull family. These are the only recongized breed of "pit bull". (I think)

I was watching and watching on the Westminster Dog Show for him to come up! Very handome doggy! -- Even the announcer/narrator was saying that these are wonderful dogs and have received a bad rap because they fall into the hands of the wrong people, they are very loyal, loving animals and it's a shame to see them treated this way -- They are typical shorter and wider then the pit bulls that we normally see around here.

Because of this ban, reputible breeder (not many in Ontario) are really upset because they will not be allowed to breed Stafforshire Terriers anymore. :sad:

mastifflover
February 18th, 2005, 10:36 AM
No breeding, no showing and this is the kicker an American Staff has never bitten or attacked anyone that is on record. Can you think of a better reason to ban a dog because it has never done anything the ignorant a$$hole Michael Bryant does not know his a$$ from a hole in the ground. Ban the Liberals or a least muzzle them till we can ban them.

sammiec
February 18th, 2005, 10:38 AM
An American Staffordshire is different then a Staffordshire. There's three types - those two and an American Pit Bull Terrier. :D

But that's what you get from someone that listens to the experts! :rolleyes: We'll leave it up to the experts he says.... not one of the experts agreed with the bill... but I thought --- he said he wasn't a surgeon, so he doesn't do surgery, he's not a dog expert, so he'll leave it up to the experts--- Hmmm....no wonder he's Liberal...can't even keep up with a lie for more then a month....

Schwinn
February 18th, 2005, 11:37 AM
An American Staffordshire is different then a Staffordshire. There's three types - those two and an American Pit Bull Terrier. :D

But that's what you get from someone that listens to the experts! :rolleyes: We'll leave it up to the experts he says.... not one of the experts agreed with the bill... but I thought --- he said he wasn't a surgeon, so he doesn't do surgery, he's not a dog expert, so he'll leave it up to the experts--- Hmmm....no wonder he's Liberal...can't even keep up with a lie for more then a month....

I thought the American Staffordshire and the APBT were the same dog, different names by different kennel clubs? And isn't the American Bulldog another subset (though excluded from the ban)?

sammiec
February 18th, 2005, 11:50 AM
There's a difference in all three.

HERE (http://www.workingpitbull.com/amstaffpit.htm)

It's a really confusing topic... but AmStaff and APBT are the "same" but different. AmStaff are typically stockier and have a heavy set frame. An American Pit Bull Terrier has very similar features, yet they tend to be a little slimmer and less boxy in appearance.

Essentially, the American Staffordshire is an American Pit Bull Terrier that is bred for show. If you see the link above it give a little more information into how they have been described as different types of a breed.

mona_b
February 18th, 2005, 11:57 AM
Sooooooo true mastiff.Not one attack has been by an American Staff.And to be honest,I have only seen about 4 Pure American Staffs around.Just like I have only seen a few Pure APBT's.One being at the Hamilton SPCA.

The American Staff is a different breed from the APBT.Features are different.The American Staff is stalkier and has the legs are a bit shorter.The head is also different.A bit bigger.

Now the Staffordshire Bull Terrier is much smaller.Only about 14-16" in height.This breed has also never been in any attacks.

Yes,the American Bulldog is of a different breed.Face actually looks like a Boxer.And this breed is much bigger then the others.

BigDogLover
February 18th, 2005, 12:13 PM
No breeding, no showing and this is the kicker an American Staff has never bitten or attacked anyone that is on record. Can you think of a better reason to ban a dog because it has never done anything the ignorant a$$hole Michael Bryant does not know his a$$ from a hole in the ground. Ban the Liberals or a least muzzle them till we can ban them.


I'm not much for Back Slapping, but, hats off for this post.

Dar.

pollito
February 20th, 2005, 02:45 PM
No breeding, no showing and this is the kicker an American Staff has never bitten or attacked anyone that is on record. Can you think of a better reason to ban a dog because it has never done anything the ignorant a$$hole Michael Bryant does not know his a$$ from a hole in the ground. Ban the Liberals or a least muzzle them till we can ban them.


And the reason why you haven't seen an American Staff attack anyone, is because if it did, it would be a "pit bull" not an American Staff. Exactly what chico was trying to say.

greaterdane
February 20th, 2005, 03:05 PM
Am staffs, staffordshire bull terriers and pitts are actually different dogs really but are very closely related. The AKC speaks of them as being cousins. The am staff is the american version of the staffordshire bull terrier with longer legs and snout more resembling the pitt bull and can be a APBT, but not when registered. The staffordshire bull terrier back in the early 19th century was referred to as the "Old Pit Bull Terrier" This was before there was an APBT and actually even before there was an English Bull Terrier. The bull terrier came from the staffordshire bull terrier. If you look at a staff bull terrier and a APBT when bred properly, you will notice a drasitc size difference, pitts are taller and staffies are smaller, alot of people cross the staff and APBT so it is hard to tell which is which now. Here is some history now that I am on a rant.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier History

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier had its beginnings in England many centuries ago when the Bulldog and Mastiff were closely linked. Bullbaiting and bearbaiting in the Elizabethan era produced large dogs for these sports and later on the 100-120 pound animal gave way to a small, more agile breed of up to 90 pounds.

Early in the 19th century the sport of dogfighting gained popularity and a smaller, faster dog was developed. It was called by names such as "Bulldog Terrier" and "Bull and Terrier." The Bulldog bred then was a larger dog than we know today and weighed about 60 pounds. This dog was crossed with a small native terrier which appears in the history of the present-day Manchester Terrier. The dog which this produced, averaging between 30 and 45 pounds, became the Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

American Staffordshire Terrier History

To correctly give the origin and history of the American Staffordshire Terrier, it is necessary to comment briefly on two other dogs, namely the Bulldog and the terrier.

Until the early part of the 19th century; the Bulldog was bred with great care in England for the purpose of baiting bulls. The Bulldog of that day was vastly different from our present-day "sourmug." Pictures from as late as 1870 represent the Bulldog as agile and as standing straight on his legs-his front legs in particular. In some cases he was even possessed of a muzzle, and long rat tails were not uncommon. The Bulldog of that day, with the exception of the head, looked more like the present-day American Staffordshire Terrier than like the present-day Bulldog.

Some writers contend it was the white English Terrier, or the Black-and-Tan Terrier, that was used as a cross with the Bulldog to perfect the Staffordshire Terrier. It seems easier to believe that any game terrier, such as the Fox Terrier of the early 1800s, was used in this cross, since some of the foremost authorities on dogs of that time state that the Black-and-Tan and the white English Terrier were none too game, but these same authorities go on to stress the gameness of the Fox Terrier. It is reasonable to believe that breeders who were attempting to perfect a dog that would combine the spirit and agility of the terrier with the courage and tenacity of the Bulldog, would not use a terrier that was not game. In analyzing the three above-mentioned terriers at that time, we find that there was not a great deal of difference in body conformation, the greatest differences being in color, aggressiveness, and spirit.

In any event, it was the cross between the Bulldog and the terrier that resulted in the Staffordshire Terrier, which was originally called the Bull-and-Terrier Dog, Half and Half, and at times Pit Dog or Pit Builterrier. Later, it assumed the name in England of Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

These dogs began to find their way into America as early as 1870, where they became known as Pit Dog, Pit Bull Terrier, later American Bull Terrier, and still later as Yankee Terrier.

In 1936, they were accepted for registration in the AKC Stud Book as Staffordshire Terriers. The name of the breed was revised effective January 1, 1972 to American Staffordshire Terrier. Breeders in this country had developed a type which is heavier in weight than the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England and the name change was to distinguish them as separate breeds.

The American Staffordshire Terrier's standard allows a variance in weight, but it should be in proportion to size. The dog's chief requisites should be strength unusual for his size, soundness, balance, a strong powerful head, a well-muscled body, and courage that is proverbial.

To clarify the confusion that may exist, even in the minds of dog fanciers, as to the difference between the American Staffordshire Terrier and the Bull Terrier, a comment on the latter may be helpful. The Bull Terrier was introduced by James Hinks of Birmingham, who had been experimenting for several years with the old bull-and-terrier dog, now known as Staffordshire. It is generally conceded that he used the Staffordshire, crossed with the white English Terrier, and some writers contend that a dash of Pointer and Dalmatian blood was also used to help perfect the all-white Bull Terrier.

In mentioning the gameness of the Staffordshire, it is not the intention to tag him as a fighting machine, or to praise this characteristic. These points are discussed because they are necessary in giving the correct origin and history of the breed. The good qualities of the dogs are many, and it would be difficult for anyone to overstress them.

American Pitt Bull Terrier history:

In 1835 the British Parliament outlawed bull baiting, a sadistic gambling game in which bulldogs were used to attack and harass bulls brought to market with the dubious intention of tenderizing the meat. The dog would assault the bull, avoid the stomping hooves and slashing horns, grab a tender nose or ear, and hang on until the bull collapsed. Commoners and royalty alike sought diversion from the violence and diseases of their day by attending these bloody spectacles until a public outcry forced Parliament to take a stand.

Once bull baiting was banned, dog breeders who appreciated the fierceness, courage, and tenacity of the bull dogs turned their attentions to breeding dogs for dog fighting. They began with the bull dog, mixed in some terrier blood, and produced the Bull and Terrier, a dog that met all of their expectations. The Bull and Terrier was bred for aggression to other dogs, unrelenting bravery, a high pain threshold, a willingness to fight to the end, and an affection for people.

Bull and Terrier dogs came to the US in the early 1800s as all-around farm dogs and frontier guardians. Samuel Clemons featured a pup of this breed in his short book The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.

The United Kennel Club recognized the Bull and Terrier Dog as the American Pit Bull Terrier in 1898. Buster Brown shoes put its mascot in every shoe with the image of Tige, an American Pit Bull Terrier, to enhance its image as a sturdy, dependable shoe. RCA used Nipper, a pit bull of unknown ancestry, to illustrate the clarity of sound emanating from its phonograph -- after all, it could fool the loyal pit bull into thinking he heard "his master's voice" in person. The breed was used to illustrate American neutrality without fear in 1914, the toughness of Levi jeans, and as a"defender of Old Glory."

The AKC eschewed breeds called "pit bulls" until 1936, when it recognized the American Pit Bull Terrier under the alias Staffordshire Terrier, named after the miners of Staffordshire, England, who had a hand in developing the breed for the fighting pit. The name was changed in 1972 to the American Staffordshire Terrier to distinguish the breed from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England, the ancestor of the American dogs, which was recognized by AKC in 1974. The British version of the dog is 14-16 inches tall and weighs up to 45 pounds. The American cousin is 18-19 inches tall and weighs up to 80 pounds. UKC's American Pit Bull Terrier is preferred to range from 30-60 pounds with females generally, but not necessarily, smaller than males.

Staffs, AmStaffs, and APBTs produced by responsible breeders are bred for temperament. Many dogs of these breeds are therapy dogs; some do quite well in obedience, and one -- Bandog Dread HIC, VB, SchH 1, CD -- even has a herding title. Another, Solomon J. Grundy, is a service dog for quadriplegic owner Arvid Kuhnle of Saskatoon, Canada, and Bullitt, was shown on the 1985 Easter Seals poster with his owner, Gordy Ranberg of Genesee, Michigan.

Lucky Rescue
February 20th, 2005, 04:36 PM
Actually, it's the Staffordshire BULL terrier that has never been involved in a single unprovoked bite on anyone.

greaterdane
February 20th, 2005, 05:02 PM
If you noticed back in the summer the THS was posting their pitts as pitt bulls and a couple weeks later they changed them to staffordshire terriers. I wonder if they found out they were different or if they thought this would make them more adoptable. Since the ban talk they post them as Pitt bulls when they are pitt bulls and staffs when they are staffs

Sorry just a little tid bit i found out that I could finally share.

chico2
February 20th, 2005, 05:08 PM
Thank's everyone for the info,I just thought the article was hypocritical,maybe they thought people would sympathise with the wounded dog more if they did not say he was a pit-bull,but rather called him a Staffordshire Terrier which he was,like many"pit-bulls".
The article was about the state of our parks,including a rusty broken bench from which the dog got his injury. :sad: