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Mouthy dogs

raingirl
February 11th, 2005, 01:11 PM
What do you suggest for training a mouthy dog?

Odin likes to "suck" on our fingers, no biting, just sucking. Also, if he gets a little over excited, he tends to try and nip at you.

What I have been doing with the nipping is getting up and walking away, and ignoring him for ten minutes. I assume that's the best thing to do, as he learns that nipping means play time is over right?

jjgeonerd
February 11th, 2005, 01:25 PM
We would say ouch in a high pitched voice and tell our dog "No bite". The high pitched noise would get her attention and she picked up what the command meant after a few times of this. Now (she's 10 months) when we say No Bite she will stop biting or nipping and just lick or stop altogether.

mastifflover
February 11th, 2005, 01:36 PM
As soon as he puts his mouth on you take your hand away and put a toy in his mouth and tell him good boy. Saying ouch usually works very well but substitute your hand for the toy.

Dukieboy
February 11th, 2005, 02:21 PM
You have to teach your dog bite inhibition. The way you do this is to have your hands in his mouth frequently. "Ouch" the bites and nips "only kisses!" and "oh soft boy" for the mouthing when they just keep thier mouth open around your hand, holding you so to speak in a relaxed situation. I have had my hands in Dukes mouth since he was a baby. I read somewhere once that dogs live in thier mouths.

tenderfoot
February 11th, 2005, 06:43 PM
Mouthing is very natural for a young dog - but all things in balance. Bite inhibition is important.
We encourage you to correct the bad choice of nipping or biting with a firm sounding 'quit' and a strong look in his eyes - then offer your hand again to allow the dog's brain to make a better choice. You can even have your hand in his mouth and position your thumb on the tongue so when he bears down you QUICKLY press down and release (causing him to open his mouth and spit your hand out) as you say quit. You are saying "we can play but you must have manners".
The problem with walking away is that you aren't ending on a positive note. He only learned failure.
The high pitched yelp or ouch places you in a submissive role and empowers the dog.