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Barking

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 08:50 PM
I live in an apt complex, so barking isnt the greatest thing. i know dogs, especially puppies (i have a 4 month old beagle) bark, but this dog goes on and on and on and on.

i used to have TWO jack russell terriers before i got divorced, and NEVER had this problem in 3 years.

i have to put him in his crate at night because he simply isnt ready to be out and not pee and poo all over the place.

you cant leave this dog for a second without him starting to cry or bark. and its not like he doesnt get attention. from 7am until midnight he is unrestricted and is free to hang out with my girlfriend who isnt currently working or anything.

during the day she puts treats in his crate to get him to realize that the crate isnt just for going to bed or whatever at night. he will curl up and sleep forever on this cushion we have, but when you put it in the crate or whatever and lock him up he FREAKS out.

first we tried the ultrasonic area anti-bark thing. that thing didnt make the slightest improvement. next we unfortunately moved to the static collar that increases up to 6x the level of static if the dark keeps barking, but it doesnt work really. it keeps him from REALLY barking, but still VERY loud in that he knows EXACTLY what he can do before it starts to go off. so he can carry on for over 8 hours straight if he isnt interrupted loud enough you can hear him outside the apartment and downstairs. fortunately we dont have a neighbor but if we get one, im sure we'll be given an ultimatem to get rid of him in short order.

also, i tried a muzzle in conjunction with the static collar AND area noise thing, but stil doesnt work. now he just does this high pitched whine that cant be picked up by the collar and isnt stopped by the muzzle. the sound thing simply doesnt do crap to him. he isnt even slightly bothered.

what the hell can i do?

mesaana
February 1st, 2005, 09:04 PM
Hello Matthew

I know this isn't going to help you much but I can't help asking: why on earth did you get a beagle in an apartment??? Beagles bark, that's what they do. (I know, I know, very occasionnally you get one that doesn't, but they are few and far between). Did you research the breed at all before getting him?

I wish you good luck. Hopefully someone else will have good ideas to fix your problem. I've never had to deal with that so I won't even try to give you advice.

Lyne

Lucky Rescue
February 1st, 2005, 09:04 PM
but this dog goes on and on and on and on.

Beagles are not good apartment dogs because this is often what they do - bark and bark and bay. Did you know that before you got this puppy?

Your Jack Russell terriers were not scent hounds who trail game and bay to keep in contact with the rest of the pack and the hunter and that's why they did not bark all the time. You cannot expect one breed to act like another who was bred for entirely different purposes.

Using all sorts of anti-barking devices and muzzles is just going to ruin this puppy's temperament. He has no idea why he is being treated this way. Nothing the least bit harsh should ever be used on puppies.

And if he's pooping and peeing all over, it means you are not supervising him properly and/or not taking him out often enough. Hounds are sometimes also not the easiest dogs to housetrain.

From everything you are saying, I really think this breed is not for you and it might be best to rehome him with someone who understands beagles and their needs.
If you want a dog, your best bet would be to get an older dog who is already housetrained and used to being alone part of the time.

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 09:07 PM
yes i knew about the breed. my grandfather raised beagles for over 20 years and once they were trained, other than barking when someone came to the door or the mailman walking by, they stopped barking.

plus, he only barks if were gone. he never ONCE has barked at anything or anyone while we are in sight.

to me the problem seems to be associated with being seperated.

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 09:08 PM
And if he's pooping and peeing all over, it means you are not supervising him properly and/or not taking him out often enough. Hounds are sometimes also not the easiest dogs to housetrain.

hes four months old and we just got him. he was at a breeder before where he could go wherever and whenever. im not an idiot. i take the dog out at least 15 times per day, and i even wake up every two hours at night to take him out.

happycats
February 1st, 2005, 09:16 PM
US Army.
Didn't you come here for advise?
If so, then you shouldn't get offened when someone offers it, we are only trying to help, and coming up with ideas to help you and your pup.
I can only tell you that every Beagle I have met was a barker.
But maybe your pup is suffering seperation anxiety.

mesaana
February 1st, 2005, 09:18 PM
About the housetraining, may I suggest the umbilical cord method? The puppy is in the house on leash and the leash is attached to you (or your girlfriend). That way, you always know where he is and as soon as you see him start sniffing and turning, you take him out. It removes the risk of all of a sudden, noticing he's busy doing a pee or a poo in the next room. When you take him out and he pees or poos, you praise him like crazy.

Also, what kind of food is he getting? And how much does he weigh? If he's not getting a good quality dog food, he might be eating too much of it and that is not helping with the quantity and frequency of bowel movements.

HTH

Lyne

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 09:18 PM
US Army.
Didn't you come here for advise?
If so, then you shouldn't get offened when someone offers it, we are only trying to help, and coming up with ideas to help you and your pup.
I can only tell you that every Beagle I have met was a barker.
But maybe your pup is suffering seperation anxiety.

yes, but you would get upset if someone talked down to you as well. people said JRT are terrible apartment dogs as well, and i had zero problems.

i was hoping more for training help, not "get rid of your dog" help. i hope you can understand that.

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 09:21 PM
About the housetraining, may I suggest the umbilical cord method? The puppy is in the house on leash and the leash is attached to you (or your girlfriend). That way, you always know where he is and as soon as you see him start sniffing and turning, you take him out. It removes the risk of all of a sudden, noticing he's busy doing a pee or a poo in the next room. When you take him out and he pees or poos, you praise him like crazy.

Also, what kind of food is he getting? And how much does he weigh? If he's not getting a good quality dog food, he might be eating too much of it and that is not helping with the quantity and frequency of bowel movements.

HTH

Lyne

thanks.

i am not sure of the brand of dog food. the breeder gave it to me, i am still waiting for him to adjust to his new home before i start integrating a new food. i read on this forum food suggestions and i will look for them when i do start to integrate.

the dogs problem isnt supervision (unless you count when we are sleeping). we close the doors to the other rooms so he can only be near one of us. he naturally wants to walk around (you cant expect him to sit in one place for 8 hours) and he will just suddenly squat and pee.

he really isnt doing much of ANYTHING BUT sniffing so its pretty hard to judge when he is about to go to the bathroom.

normalyl we catch him mid act though.

happycats
February 1st, 2005, 09:26 PM
I don't think anyone was talking down to you, I believe they were only trying to be helpful.
It's so good to know that you want to keep your dog and work with him, and not just get rid of him ! :)
Maybe you can turn on the radio or TV when you leave, ,as some dogs find this comforting.

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 09:28 PM
I don't think anyone was talking down to you, I believe they were only trying to be helpful.
It's so good to know that you want to keep your dog and work with him, and not just get rid of him ! :)
Maybe you can turn on the radio or TV when you leave, ,as some dogs find this comforting.

actualyl i think if i could find the right connector i was thinking of taping my voice and burning it to CD and playing it on repeat next to his crate at night.

i hate that damn muzzle i hope that he gets housebroken soon enough that we dont have to keep using it. when he sleeps on the cushion next to the bed for a few hours in the morn he is quiet.

i really dont think he will bark once he is trained. people said the same thing about jacks, that they bark incessantly etc etc, and other than if someone came to the door or they saw a squirrel out the window, they were fine also.

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 09:30 PM
here is what i said in another thread:

Need some help as well, and a lot of things have been answered here but not everything.

I have a 4 month old beagle that we just got this weekend. He does an EXCELLANT job for the most part about pooping outside, but he refuses to pee. i can be out there up to an hour at times with no pee.

then he will come back into the house and ten minutes later you catch him peeing on the carpet or on the tile in the kitchen. we have that natures miricale and something else we use to clean up after him, but it doesnt work.

he doesnt pee in the same spot either, its just wherever he feels like it, never twice in the same spot so far in a couple of days.

i cant seem to get him to pee outside. any suggestions?

also, this dog poops like 6 times per day. we feed him at the same time, 6am and 5pm, 1 cup of dry food each time. i thought dogs were supposed to hold it approx their month of age in hours, but this dog goes pee or poo (inside and out) at least 15 times per day.

i even wake up every two hours at night to take him out...but its just not working and im only getting like 3-4 hours of sleep to boot.

i take treats with me and when he goes outside i praise him and give him treats but hes just not grasping the concept at all.

mesaana
February 1st, 2005, 09:32 PM
You can probably do a search on separation anxiety on this forum and find some good ideas to help you (if it is indeed separation anxiety). One of the important things to know is that you cannot make a fuss when you leave or when you come back. Plus, have you tried giving him a toy when you leave, to keep him occupied? A special toy he really likes, and he gets only when you leave. A stuffed Kong often works (don't put too much of the treat in it, as he is still young).

You said you just got him. How long is that? 2 days, 2 weeks, 2 months?

Oh, and I agree completely with Lucky, he's too young for all these negative methods to stop the barking (collars and things). And if he is suffering from SA, they are just causing more anxiety...

Lyne

Lucky Rescue
February 1st, 2005, 09:34 PM
hes four months old and we just got him. he was at a breeder before where he could go wherever and whenever. im not an idiot

I never implied you were an idiot, but I had no way of knowing you just got the dog since you didn't mention it in your original post. Since the breeder never bothered with any training you will have to be extra vigilant and patient. Here's a bunch of very good links on housetraining.
Housetraining puppies (http://www.wonderpuppy.net/canwehelp/htpuppy.htm) Choose one method and stick with it.

There may be quiet beagles out there (I'm sure there are) but I've never seen one. I"m sure someone will have better advice about the barking.

I didn't suggest you "get rid of him". I suggested he may be better off in a home where silence is not necessary, and he won't have to have bark collars and muzzles put on him at 16 weeks old. I did not mean this in an insulting way. Not every breed of dog is suitable for everyone.

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 09:38 PM
You can probably do a search on separation anxiety on this forum and find some good ideas to help you (if it is indeed separation anxiety). One of the important things to know is that you cannot make a fuss when you leave or when you come back. Plus, have you tried giving him a toy when you leave, to keep him occupied? A special toy he really likes, and he gets only when you leave. A stuffed Kong often works (don't put too much of the treat in it, as he is still young).

You said you just got him. How long is that? 2 days, 2 weeks, 2 months?

Oh, and I agree completely with Lucky, he's too young for all these negative methods to stop the barking (collars and things). And if he is suffering from SA, they are just causing more anxiety...

Lyne


from my understanding from what i have read is that with sep anxiety they do a lot of drooling and what not, and he really doesnt do that. he just barks and whines. maybe its a minor form of sep anxiety and ill do some more reseach im about to take him for a walk right now.

i just got him this past weekend.

yes i know its going to be tough because he wasnt trained with the breeder, thats why i was asking for advice. with my jacks, i had them from 8 weeks on. hell their poop was like the size of my pinky nail.

happycats
February 1st, 2005, 09:38 PM
Seems he's just like a brand new puppy, even though he is 4 months, because he has never been trained (left to go wherever and whenever he pleased at the breeder)
So it's going to by like working with an 8 week old!! I think you are doing the right things (taking him out often and rewarding him when he goes outside)
And it's just going to take time and perseverance!
Good luck to you!

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 09:40 PM
I never implied you were an idiot, but I had no way of knowing you just got the dog since you didn't mention it in your original post. Since the breeder never bothered with any training you will have to be extra vigilant and patient. Here's a bunch of very good links on housetraining.
Housetraining puppies (http://www.wonderpuppy.net/canwehelp/htpuppy.htm) Choose one method and stick with it.

There may be quiet beagles out there (I'm sure there are) but I've never seen one. I"m sure someone will have better advice about the barking.

I didn't suggest you "get rid of him". I suggested he may be better off in a home where silence is not necessary, and he won't have to have bark collars and muzzles put on him at 16 weeks old. I did not mean this in an insulting way. Not every breed of dog is suitable for everyone.

ok well lets just leave it at that and ill say "moat-a-sef-am" (i am sorry, in Farsi).

im sorry i didnt mention that in my orig post, i thought that i had, but that was my other thread and i got confused.

not only from my experience with my grandfather and my mother (who lived with him for about 15 years of the breeding), there were also two beagle owners in my old apartment complex and they never barked. even when i had my two dogs near them.

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 09:41 PM
Seems he's just like a brand new puppy, even though he is 4 months, because he has never been trained (left to go wherever and whenever he pleased at the breeder)
So it's going to by like working with an 8 week old!! I think you are doing the right things (taking him out often and rewarding him when he goes outside)
And it's just going to take time and perseverance!
Good luck to you!


thanks. i had done a lot of research when training my jacks, so i was hoping i missed or forgot something with this pup that maybe someone could provide.

twodogsandacat
February 1st, 2005, 09:54 PM
I know the pee rag works most of the time. Next time he pees soak it up with a rag - then save it. Take it outside and throw it down. Then wait.

The only disclaimer here is that it really helps to train the dog which spot you want him to pee in but you already said he doesn't always go in the same spot. Still it might work.

How are the neighbours (Ca. spelling)?
.

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 10:19 PM
I know the pee rag works most of the time. Next time he pees soak it up with a rag - then save it. Take it outside and throw it down. Then wait.

The only disclaimer here is that it really helps to train the dog which spot you want him to pee in but you already said he doesn't always go in the same spot. Still it might work.

How are the neighbours (Ca. spelling)?
.

we dont have any at this point so im hoping to train him before we get some. we tried the pee rag method and he thought it was so fun to just start eating the rag.

Lucky Rescue
February 1st, 2005, 11:06 PM
he never ONCE has barked at anything or anyone while we are in sight.

One last thing - very important. You say he never barks when you are there, so are you leaving him alone with a muzzle on that is tight enough to keep his mouth closed?

YOu must never ever do this. No dog should be left with a muzzle on. If he needs to pant and cannot he could easily die from overheating.

this dog poops like 6 times per day. we feed him at the same time, 6am and 5pm, 1 cup of dry food each time

That is a LOT of food for a small puppy - the same amount my 75 lb dog eats. If you are feeding an inferior brand - like Pedigree, Purina etc - then this is why he's pooping so much.

Cheap food is full of cheap ingredients like corn which is not digestible, so much of what goes in comes back out. With a high quality food, it's much more digestible, so you do not need to feed nearly as much of it. Less food - less poop, and better nutrition!

twodogsandacat
February 1st, 2005, 11:25 PM
we dont have any at this point so im hoping to train him before we get some. we tried the pee rag method and he thought it was so fun to just start eating the rag.

OK. I did say most of the time. I'm glad there is no additional pressure from neighbours.

LuckyRescue is right about the food. It does cost a little more but you put less in and you get even less out. I felt like I was getting ripped off and then I remembered what I was getting less of. I started feeding better food after coming to this board and I sure see a difference in both my dogs.

I love beagles. We found a stray sitting in the road once and kept it overnight until the owner called the shelter, it wore our Dalton out (not easy to do).
.

US Army 97E
February 1st, 2005, 11:33 PM
One last thing - very important. You say he never barks when you are there, so are you leaving him alone with a muzzle on that is tight enough to keep his mouth closed?

YOu must never ever do this. No dog should be left with a muzzle on. If he needs to pant and cannot he could easily die from overheating.

yes but no. its left on but he can still lick things and breath very easily.

tenderfoot
February 2nd, 2005, 12:56 PM
Wow, a lot of activity on this one and in only 1 day!
Your little darling is on his way to seperation anxiety. He was never alone at the breeders and hasn't been alone much at home. Muzzles and shock collars don't teach a thing. You, as his awesome parents, need to teach him how to be alone and self entertain. You do this first by re-training him to the crate. General rules & precautions:
•Crate should be big enough for the dog to stand up turn around & lie down again.
•NEVER leave a collar on a crated dog – they can hang themselves too easily.
•All interactions with the crate should be positive.
•Always praise your dog when he enters the crate – all steps in the right direction are rewarded.
•Keep the crate available to him so he can choose to go in when he wants to.
•Whining & barking can be ignored or stop it with a ‘startle’ noise & a firm “Quiet”
•Do not ‘coo’ at, or look at the dog when he is complaining – this rewards bad behavior.
•Do not shove him in and abandon him thinking he’ll just get over it.
•Do not abandon the dog to the crate and leave the house until he has proven his acceptance of it and even then only for short periods of time and increase the time gradually.
•If your dog soils the crate it could be too large, or the time in the crate was too long, or he was not eased into the training and is stressing out.

Day 1 –
•The crate should be on the ground with the door open or off, and in an area commonly used by the family (in the bedroom at night).
•While playing with your dog throw toys beside and inside for the dog to get.
•Feed him in front of or inside of the crate – go as far in as he will tolerate.

When your dog or puppy is sleepy, put him inside the crate and lay down on your stomach with your head blocking the doorway. Pretend your napping too; block your dog’s attempts to escape. Don’t make eye contact, stay calm, like you’re trying to sleep. Within 2-3 minutes your dog should lie down & sleep especially if a nap is what he needs. As soon as he falls asleep go about your business leaving the door open. Be aware when he does wake up he will need a potty break.

Day 2 – If things are working well you can combine days 1, 2 & 3 into 1-2 days.
•Keep throwing toys & occasional treats in the crate and beside it.
•Feed as far inside the crate as he is comfortable with - don’t shut door unless dog is comfortable.
•All naps are inside the crate & say ‘kennel up’ (or what ever association word you prefer).
•Quickly say, ‘kennel up’, let the dog go in first & then reward with treat & a warm voice.

Day 3 – Same as days 1 & 2
While you are watching TV or reading or on the computer – put the crate beside you and ask your dog to ‘kennel up’ & give them 3-4 good toys. Shut the door. If he barks you can either ignore him or stop it with a ‘startle’. A ‘startle’ is a short sharp noise, a clap of your hands, an intense (not loud) “HEY!”, or smack the side of the crate to startle (not scare) your dog. Don’t stare or ‘coo’ at him – this rewards bad behavior. Dogs will typically only challenge you 3-5 times and then they submit – so be patient. When he has been quiet for a little while you can let him out and praise his efforts. Lots of short times in the crate will help him understand that the crate does not mean you are leaving him for hours each time and he will be more cooperative about going in. Be inconsistent with the time by having him confined for two minutes one time and 15 minutes the next. Perhaps he is in the crate while you are quickly brushing your teeth, and the next time he is in there while you fix dinner. Try to increase time and distance; the time the dog stays in the crate and your distance away from the crate. This will help him be ready for the longer times you have to be gone. Do not expect young puppies to be good in a crate for much longer than a nap would last – they just don’t have that much bladder control.

He should not getting up at night for potty breaks. Take his water away at about 7 pm and make his last meal at about 5-6 pm. Then be sure he has plenty of opportunity to potty before bed. Having him sleep in your bed will help him sleep deeply (near your warm bodies and beating hearts) and he should be good til sunrise. If he does get up then take him out and right back to bed - no time for playing.

heidiho
February 2nd, 2005, 01:01 PM
I dont believe because he poops all over the house means he isnt properly watching the dog......It could be something else .......

US Army 97E
February 2nd, 2005, 02:30 PM
good info tenderfoot, ill see what i can do tonight. his crate is large but i have something in it so he doesnt get aruond too much in there.

mona_b
February 2nd, 2005, 06:00 PM
A muzzle should NEVER be left on a dog,especially a puppy,all day.I agree that you should treat him as an 8 week old puppy even though he is 4 months.Question,since you are in an apartment,are you paper training him?
When I got my GSD's at 3 months old,they were paper trained.My breeder took the time to do this with the pups.As for the food,I wouldn't worry about waiting for him to get used to his new home.You can change the food now.That's if he is on a crappy food.What is it that you are feeding him?Also,how long are you gone during the day?